Case Directory
  Category 1, Distant Encounters 
 
  Preliminary
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A Hynek Classification of Distant Encounter is usually an incident involving an object more than 500 feet from the witness. At night it is classified as a "nocturnal light" (NL) and during the day as a "daylight disc" (DD). The size of the object or the viewing conditions may render the object in greater detail but yet not qualify the sighting as a Close Encounter which is an object within 500'. 

Sphere Startles Thousands
Nov. 12, 1954
Louisville, Kentucky


Fran Ridge:
Nov. 12, 1954; Louisville, Ky, Tennessee & Ohio (BB)
3:00-6:00 p.m. local. Observed by military and civilian witnesses, a spherical object moved south, hovered for three hours.  U.S. Air Force jets tried to intercept it but it was too high.  It was also observed from the ground through a theodolite. The AP article we located states that an Air Force Sabrejet fighter from Wright-Patterson AFB vainly cruised the sky over the city trying for a close view of the object. The shiny object, estimated at an altitude of 80,000 feet, caught the eye of thousands of persons that Saturday. Seemingly motionless, it was a brillinat white at first, slowly turned yellow, finally red, and then disappeared in the dusk. The fighter reached an altitude of 40,000 feet but failed to sight the object. No mention in this article (*) or the documents where the object "moved quickly south" as the NICAP source had listed. Documents located by Dan Wilson indicate the culprit was probably a large (70-100') skyhook balloon released by General Mills. [UFOE, 134, VIII].

Mike Swords:
I have no file. The case is referred to in Stringfield's CRIFO Newsletter {December 3, 1954, pp.3-4} and in Hynek's UFO Report, pp.51-2. These two sources differ markedly in their view of this. Stringfield claims that it was certainly no balloon, while Hynek uses the case to show that when an explanation such as a balloon was clearly true, that was the only time that the USAF would be cooperative. 180 degrees out of phase.

Detailed reports and documents
reports/541112louisville_report.htm (Dan Wilson & Bill Schroeder)
* Publication: Pacific Stars And Stripes, Tokyo, Japan; Issue Date: November 14, 1954




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