Category 11 Case Directory
  SIGHTINGS FROM AIRCRAFT 
 
  Preliminary
Rating: 5  

                                   
     

AVCAT is a special project being conducted by NICAP, with the help and cooperation of the original compiler of AIRCAT, Dr. Richard Haines, and other sources, to create a comprehensive listing of sightings from aircraft with detailed documentation from these sources, including Projects SIGN, GRUDGE & BLUE BOOK.

Two Helicopters Encounter Venus (CIRVIS)
Aug. 11, 1954
Lawson AFB, Columbus, Georgia

8:54 p.m. EST
Duration  35 mins
aircraft 2 helicopters
United States
Military
4 + observers
No EMI
No radar contact

Brad Sparks:
Aug. 11, 1954.  Lawson AFB and Columbus Airport, Columbus, Georgia [not Maxwell AFB, which was reporting agency]
8:54 p.m. (EST).  Lawson AFB Tower Operator AFC Chase E. Lewis, 1926-3 Det. AACS, observed strange stationary object in the W at azimuth 270° at about 2500 ft, varying in brightness, changing color from white to red to orange to white again, with seeming high speed motions [due to autokinesis].  Army helicopter 267 piloted by WO-JG R. T. Wade (506th Helicopter Co., Ft. Benning, Ga.) sent to investigate, heading 270° at 2,500 ft, located object at 20 miles W of Lawson AFB Tower (Ft. Benning) at 2,000 ft, abandoned pursuit due to low fuel after less than 2 mins, at about 8:54-8:56 p.m.  AFC Lewis reported to Base Operations Dispatcher A/2c O. A. Register, Hqs Sq, Lawson AFB.  At 8:56 p.m. Airdrome Officer and driver sighted object at Lawson AFB.  At 9:05 p.m., two additional Lawson Tower operators included AFC William N. Watson, 1926-3 Det AACS.  Second Army helicopter, no. 294, on mission piloted by WO-JG G. [U.?] S. Tarma (506th Helicopter Co., Ft. Benning, Ga.) diverted to object at 9:27 p.m., sighted it then it disappeared still at 270° azimuth (due W) at 9:29 p.m.  Seen again next night in the W at 8:15 p.m. for 6 mins lost in two layers of scattered clouds.  [Probable Venus IFO, as Venus was low on W horizon at azimuth 264°-268° and elevation 7° to 0° until setting at about 9:30 p.m. time of object’s disappearance.  BB conclusion of Mars grossly in error, with erroneous astro calc of SW at 20° elevation when Mars in fact was in the S at azimuth 177°-186° elevation 30°-25°, rising not setting, during time of sighting.]  (Paul Dean, Mike Tarbell, Sparks;  NICAP website;  BB files;  Weinstein;  Saunders/FUFOR Index)

Detailed reports and documents
reports/540811lawson_report.htm (Dan Wilson)
docs/540811lawson_doc1.pdf [page 1 of 2] (Paul Dean) *
docs/540811columbus_docs.pdf [fold docs] (Mike Tarbell)



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