From: daniel wilson <daniejon2000@yahoo.co.uk>
To: Fran Ridge <nicap@insightbb.com>
Sent: Thursday, 20 September 2012, 6:35
Subject: Jan. 16, 1951; Nr. Artesia, N. Mex. / Corporal Launch


Interesting to note on the same day:


January 16, 1951; White Sands, New Mexico
The Corporal was the first U.S. guided missile system to be approved
for nuclear armament, and the first operational guided missile of the
U.S. Army.

1951 January 16 - Test mission Launch Vehicle:

http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/corporal.htm
Corporal. Corporal E 7R Apogee: 50 km (31 mi).

Short range ballistic missile. Year: 1953. IOC: 1953. Family:
Country: USA. Status: Out of production. Department of Defence
Designation: MGM-5. Popular Name: Corporal. Alternate Designation:
SSM-A-17. At request of Army Ordnance, Cal Tech's rocket laboratory
developed the first US long-range missiles. Project ORDCIT resulted in
development of the Private A and Corporal missiles.
Historical Essay ©
http://www.designation-systems.net/
Andreas Parsch
JPL/Firestone SSM-A-17/M2/MGM-5 Corporal
The Corporal was the first U.S. guided missile system to be approved
for nuclear armament, and the first operational guided missile of the
U.S. Army. It evolved from a series of Army research rockets begun in
1944/45.

The first missile to carry the name Corporal was the small WAC
Corporal (designated RTV-G-1 in 1947) sounding rocket, first launched
in September 1945. The WAC Corporal B was later also used to create
an experimental two-stage research rocket, when it was mounted on top
of captured German V-2 missiles. 8 of these vehicles, known as RTV-G-4
Bumper, were used for tests between 1948 and 1950.

The immediate forerunner of the tactical Corporal SSM was the RTV-G-2
Corporal E surface-to-surface test vehicle. It was first flown in May 1947.
The Corporal E was used to evaluate basic principles of ballistic guided
missile construction, flight, and guidance. Because of continuing problems
with the Army's SSM-G-9 Hermes program, it was decided in 1950 to
develop the Corporal E into a tactical nuclear-armed ballistic missile,
designated SSM-G-17 Corporal. In 1951, the Army's missile designation
system changed slightly, and the RTV-G-2 and SSM-G-17 became RV-A-2
and SSM-A-17, respectively. However, the RV-A-2 designation was dropped
almost at the same time, and all Corporal test rounds were known as
XSSM-A-17.

Map showing the location of Artesia, New Mexico

White Sands is approx. 75 miles west of Artesia, NM.