Date:
From: CARL FEINDT <waterufo@prodigy.net>
Subject:  Mid-July 1966; Pacific Ocean bt. Seattle, WA & Hawaii / USO Tracked On Radar
To: RADCAT


The following report has been extracted from the Carl Feindt Water UFO web site for security purposes. To get to the original page with potentially more current working links, click on the link below, hit "Enter", click on "List of Sightings", then select "radar" in the search box.
http://www.waterufo.net/

UFO segment is located at *** area.

07-MM-1966

MM (Mid) is between the 9th and 18th. For information on the date see the paragraph at the end.

[From military form “NAVPERS 601 (Rev. 3-56)” ­ he served on the sub between 01-21-1966 and 08-06-1966] in book p. 384. ­CF-

Submarines name “USS Tiru” (SS-416), p. 384 plus text prior to p. 17 of the referenced book. Bold text in the following by Me.-CF-

Number three happened during a transit between the Portland-Seattle area and Pearl Harbor. I was the port lookout during the afternoon watch (1200 to 1600 hours). Geronimo was the starboard lookout. Ensign Ball was the OOD (Officer of the Deck). We were doing 10 knots on the surface and the three of us were on the bridge in the conning tower. It was a bright day, but the sun was obscured by a low layer of clouds. It was cool. We had a bit of fun when someone below requested permission to put a man on deck forward to get something that was needed from the waterproof deck locker. The locker was under the deck plate all the way up on the bow near the forward torpedo-room escape trunk. Geronimo and I laughed when Ensign Ball gave his approval. He really shouldn't have, because we were running a pressure wave over the bow. When we saw who it was they had sent on deck we roared with laughter. We looked down over the side of the sail at the deck-level door just as it popped open and Seaman Lincoln Loving stuck his head out. He didn't look happy.

Lincoln reached down and put the runner in the safety track in the deck, fastened the safety belt around his waist and, grabbing the handrail, stepped out on deck. He looked up at us with that "don't you laugh at me" look that he did so well. It took him a few minutes to get up the nerve to let go of the handrail and begin to make his way forward against the wind and the pitching deck. Gingerly, he crept forward until he was just at the point where the pressure wave was rolling off the deck when the bow heaved free of the water on its cyclical upswing.

I could see that Lincoln was trying to time a run forward when the bow was out of the water. He made a couple of false starts, then ran slipping on the wet deck, disappearing into the access hole for the forward torpedo-room escape hatch. The bow plunged underwater and I found myself sucking air as I imagined the cold saltwater swirling around me. It wasn't me, though, it was Lincoln. I gripped the top of the sail as I waited for the bow to swing up, hoping that Lincoln wouldn't panic.

What we saw next could have been a clip from one of those old Keystone Cops movies. Lincoln was flailing water so hard that it looked like he had 40 arms and 40 legs. It was only then that I realized that Lincoln had joined the Navy but he didn't know how to swim. When he finally gathered a foothold, the half-drowned seaman exploded up out of that hole like a Polaris missile and ran back to the conning tower just as fast as his wet leather soles would carry him.

Ensign Ball, Geronimo, and I laughed for a good ten minutes. In fact, every time we saw Lincoln for the next two days we would burst out laughing. Lincoln didn't think it was funny and didn't miss a chance to slug us every time we laughed.

*** UFO/USO segment

Lincoln went below. Geronimo and I began the unending task of sweeping the horizon from bow to stern, then the sky from horizon to zenith, and then back to the horizon from bow to stern. Again and again, and then a pause to rest our eyes and chat for a few minutes. I asked Ensign Ball to call for some hot coffee. As he bent over the 1MC, I turned, raising my binoculars to my eyes just in time to see a huge disk rise from beneath the ocean, water streaming from the air around it, tumble lazily on its axis, and disappear into the clouds. My heart beat wildly. I tried to talk but couldn't; then I changed my mind and decided I didn't want to say that, anyway. I had seen a flying saucer the size of an aircraft carrier come right out of the ocean and fly into the clouds. I looked around quickly to see if anyone else had seen it. Ensign Ball was still bending over the 1MC. He was ordering coffee. Geronimo was looking down the starboard side aft.

I was torn between my duty to report what I had seen and the knowledge that if I did no one would believe me. As I looked out over the ocean I saw only sky, clouds, and water.

It was as if nothing had happened. I almost thought I had dreamed it. Ensign Ball straightened, turned toward Geronimo and said the coffee was on the way up.

I looked back toward the spot, about 15 degrees relative off the port bow, and about 2-1/2 nautical miles distant. Nothing, not even a hint of what had happened. "Ensign Ball," I said, "I thought I saw something about 15 degrees relative off the bow, but I lost it. Can you help me look over that area?" Ensign Ball turned, raising his glasses to eye level. I didn't know it at, the time, but Geronimo had heard me and turned to look. He was happy that something had broken the monotony.

I was just lifting the binoculars off my chest when I saw it. The giant saucer shape plunged out of the clouds, tumbled, and, pushing the water before it, opened up a hole in the ocean and disappeared from view. It was incredible. This time I had seen it with my naked eyes, and its size in comparison with the total view was nothing short of astounding. Ensign Ball stood in shock, his binoculars in his hands, his mouth open. Geronimo yelled, "Holy shit! What the - hey! did you guys see that?" Ensign Ball turned, and looking right at me with the most incredulous look on his face, said in a low voice, "This had to happen on my watch!" He turned, quickly pressing the override on the 1MC and yelled, "Captain to the bridge, Captain to the bridge." As an afterthought he pressed the switch again and yelled, "Somebody get a camera up here.”

The Captain surged up the ladder with the quartermaster on his heels. Chief Quartermaster Quintero had the ship’s 35-mm camera slung around his neck. The Captain stood patiently while Ensign Ball tried to describe what he had seen. He glanced at us and we both nodded in affirmation. That was enough for the Captain. He called sonar, who during the excitement had reported contact underwater at the same bearing. The Captain announced into the 1MC, ''This is the Captain. I have the conn." The reply came back instantly from the helm, "Aye, Aye sir." I knew that the helmsman was passing the word in the control room that the Captain had personally taken control of the boat. I also knew that rumors were probably flying through the vessel.

The Captain called down and ordered someone to closely monitor the radar. His command was instantly acknowledged. As the five of us stood gazing out over the sea the same ship or one exactly like it rose slowly, turned in the air, tilted at an angle and then vanished. I saw the Chief snapping pictures out of the corner of my eye.

This time I had three images from which to draw conclusions. It was a metal machine, of that there was no doubt whatsoever. It was intelligently controlled, of that I was equally sure. It was a dull color, kind of like pewter. There were no lights. There was no glow. I thought I had seen a row of what looked like portholes, but could not be certain. Radar reported contact at the same bearing and gave us a range of 3 nautical miles. The range was right on, as the craft had moved toward the general direction that we were headed. We watched repeatedly as the strange craft reentered the water and then subsequently rose into the clouds over and over again until finally we knew that it was gone for good. The episode lasted about 10 minutes.

Before leaving the bridge the Captain took the camera from the Chief and instructed each of us not to talk to anyone about what we had seen. He told us the incident was classified and we were not to discuss it, not even amongst ourselves. We acknowledged his order. The Captain and the Chief left the bridge. Ensign Ball stepped to the 1MC and, pressing the override switch, announced, "This is Ensign Ball. The Captain has left the bridge. I have the conn." The reply, "Aye aye sir," quickly followed.

Those of us who had witnessed the UFO were not allowed to go ashore after we had berthed in Pearl. Even those of us who didn't have the duty were told we had to stay aboard. After about two hours a commander from the Office of Naval Intelligence boarded. He went directly to the Captain's stateroom. It wasn't long before we were called to wait in the passageway outside the Captain's door. Ensign Ball was called first. After about 10 minutes he came out and went into the wardroom. He looked shaken. I was next.

When I entered the stateroom, the Commander was holding my service record in his hands. He wanted to know why I had gone from the Air Force into the Navy. I told him the whole story and he laughed when I said that after putting off the Navy for fear of chronic seasickness, I hadn't been seasick yet. Suddenly a mask dropped over his face, and looking me directly in the eyes he asked, "What did you see out there?"

"I believe it was a flying saucer, sir," I answered.

The man began to visibly shake and he screamed obscenities at me. He threatened to put me in the brig for the rest of my life. I thought he wasn't going to stop yelling, but as suddenly as he began, he stopped.

I was confused. I had answered his question truthfully; yet I was threatened with prison. I was not afraid, but I was not very confident, either. I figured I had better take another tack. Eighteen years with my father and four years in the Air Force had taught me something. Number one was that officers just do not lose control like that, ever. Number two was that if my answer had elicited that explosion, then the next thing out of my mouth had better be something entirely different. Number three was that his response had been an act of kindness to get me to arrive at exactly that conclusion.

"Let's start all over again," he said. "What did you see out there?"

"Nothing, sir," I answered. "I didn't see a damn thing, and I'd like to get out of here just as soon as possible."

A smile spread over his face and the Captain looked relieved. "Are you sure, Cooper?" he asked.

"Yes sir, I replied, "I'm sure."

"You're a good sailor, Cooper," he said. "The Navy needs men like you. You'll go far with the Navy.” He then asked me to read several pieces of paper that all said the same thing only with different words. I read that if I ever talked about what it was that I didn't see, I could be fined up to $10,000 arid imprisoned for up to 10 years or both. In addition I could lose all pay and allowances due or ever to become due. He asked me to sign a piece of paper stating that I understood the laws and regulations that I had just read governing the safeguard of classified information relating to the national security. By signing, I agreed never to communicate in any manner any information regarding the incident with anyone. I was dismissed, and boy, was I glad to get out of there.

This reference: Behold A Pale Horse by William Cooper, pp. 17-21, © 1991. With thanks to Doyel Shamley and Rob Houghton of: http://www.hourofthetime.com for permission to post to this website


UFOCAT PRN ­ NONE


Pacific Ocean


Portland, Oregon        Latitude 45-31-25 N, Longitude 122-40-30 W (D-M-S)


Seattle, Washington    Latitude 47-39-38 N, Longitude 122-19-38 W [North Seattle]


Keyport, Washington  Latitude 47-42-08 N, Longitude 122-37-11 W [See: Re: The date]


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii  Latitude 21-21-18 N, Longitude 157-58-20 W




TIRU conducted three more WesPac deployments through 1965 before she returned to a schedule of local operations. TIRU entered another major overhaul on 6 December 1965 -- one which saw the installation of a masking system to cover the ship's own noise while snorkeling. Further internal alterations improved both her fighting capability and her habitability. She conducted sea trials until 14 June 1966 when she departed Hawaii for the Naval Torpedo Station at Keyport, WA, for an alignment and testing of her weapon system. The submarine departed the west coast on 9 July, bound for Hawaiian waters, and made port at Pearl Harbor nine days later to commence pre-deployment operations.

This reference: http://www.subnet.com/fleet/ss416.htm Page Title USS TIRU (SS-416).