Form: 97, NUFORC Report
Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2006 12:45:23 +0100 (BST)
From: daniel wilson <daniejon2000@yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: June 15, 1966, Whiteman AFB, Missouri / Whiteman AFB Minuteman ICBM Complex
Cat: 3, 10, Evidence of Cat 7
To: Francis Ridge <nicap@insightbb.com>
 
 
June 15, 1966, Whiteman AFB, Missouri
Whiteman AFB Minuteman ICBM Complex

(Note: Also see memo by Ted Phillips
)
 
http://www.nuforc.org/webreports/018/S18745.html
 
 
Occurred : 6/15/1966 21:00 (Entered as : 06/15/66 2100CDT)
Reported: 7/30/2001 20:14
Posted: 8/5/2001
Location: Whiteman AFB, MO
Shape: Disk
Duration:2 hours

Military sighting of saucer like object in Missouri

I was in the air force, stationed at Whiteman AFB, working in the command post. At approx. 2100 hours,
I received a call from the Wing Security controller asking me to tune my radio to the base frequency. I did and started listening to a series of events that began with a missile site losing power and a strike team being dispatched to the site only to see this saucer shaped device hovering over the site. When the team was ordered to advance onto the site, the device backed away and power returned as soon as it was away from the site.

This happened in the southernmost flight
area OF THE MISSILE COMPLEX. THE DEVICE BEGAN A SLOW NORTHERLY ROUTE, TRACKING OVER MISSILE SITES AS IT WENT. EACH TIME IT WOULD CROSS A SITE, THE POWER WOULD BE LOST AND RETURN AS SOON AS IT PASSED AWAY. THE DEVICE CAME NEARLY OVER THE BASE AND WAS VISUALLY SIGHTED BY THE WEATHER OBSERVERS AND CONTROL TOWER PERSONNEL. IT CONTINUED NORTH OUT OF THE WING AREA WITHOUT INCIDENT EXCEPT FOR THE POWER OUTAGES.

I turned all information into the AF Project Blue Book and never heard
of the situation again.

(NUFORC Note: We have attempted to telephone this witness, in order to obtain more details, but have been
unsuccessful in reaching him, to date. PD)

 
Knob Noster, Missouri, near Whiteman AFB
Map
 
 
 
 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/facility/images/whiteafb.gif
Whiteman AFB Minuteman ICBM Complex
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/facility/whiteman.htm
 
On June 14, 1961, the US Government announced
that Whiteman would serve as a support base for
the fourth Minuteman strategic missile wing. After
the announcement, there were second thoughts
about the choice as original plans called for launchers
to be spread into the Lake of the Ozarks region. Due
to the terrain inaccessibility and the high water table,
these plans were scrapped. Consequently, when the
final approval came on January 17, 1962, the launchers
were placed in the vicinity of Whiteman, making this
the smallest Minuteman base with regard to area.
In February 1962, the Los Angeles-based Corps of
Engineers Ballistic Missile Construction Office established
a resident office at Whiteman. Meanwhile, the Real
Estate Division of the Corps of Engineers Kansas City
District set up an office in Sedalia to acquire the needed
land. The the firm of Morrison, Hardeman, Perrini, and
Level submitted a low bid of $60.6 million and was
awarded the contract on March 20, 1962. Although
construction commenced on April 2, official groundbreaking
ceremonies occurred on April 14, 1962, with several
congressmen and Governor John Dalton joining military
officials at the event.
The contractors used 168,000 yards of concrete, 25,355
tons of reinforcing steel and 15,120 tons of structural
steel for construction of hardened, underground launch
facilities and 15 launch control centers. The project
called for the excavation of 867,000 cubic yards of earth
and rock. In addition, the project called for the installation
of a vast underground intersite cable network. If laid end to
end in a straight line, this cable would stretch from
Whiteman AFB to 100 miles beyond Los Angeles.
Construction of the complex was officially completed in
June 1964.
The enormity of the ensuing construction effort
encompassed not only installing 150 silos and 15 launch
control complexes but also constructing/reconstructing
numerous roads and bridges throughout rural western
Missouri. The ‘Hardened Intersite Cable System,” measuring
some 1,777 miles, connected the launch control centers
and required land rights-of-entry from more than 6,000
landowners.
During construction, management-labor relations were
described as “excellent.” With the exception of ironworkers,
the local region supplied the project’s manpower needs.
There were five work stoppages, of which three involved
union jurisdiction disputes. The Federal Mediation and
Conciliation Service resolved one dispute while the others
were handled at lower levels. In addition, there were only
11 “time-lost” injuries; no fatalities.
On June 10, 1963, the Army Corps of Engineers and
civilian construction contractors turned the first flight of
silos over to the Air Force Site Activation Task Force
(SATAF). Over the next 5 months SATAF received
responsibility for making final installations on the rest
of the silos in preparation for final turnover to SAC. The
keys to the final flight of silos were turned over to SATAN
and the integration contractor (Boeing) on November
26, 1963.
The first Minuteman I missile arrived from the Boeing
plant at Hill AFB, Utah, on January 14, 1964. Soon the
holes dotting the Missouri landscape were filled with
ICBMs. By June 29, 1964, the last flight of missiles went
on alert status, making the 351st a fully operational
strategic missile wing.
Beginning on May 7, 1966, and throughout the rest of
1966 and into 1967, the Air Force replaced the
Minuteman I “B’s” with Minuteman 11s. The completed
transition in October 1967 gave the 351st SMW the
distinction of being the first wing to complete the Force
Modernization Program. One of the retired Minuteman Is
eventually found its way to a Bicentennial Peace Park
located on base.
Before completion of the construction, SAC activated the
351st Strategic Missile Wing at Whiteman on Feb. 1, 1963.
The 340th BMW gradually phased out operations during
the same year with its remnants transferring to Bergstrom
AFB, Texas, on Sept. 1, 1963.
After the mission change in 1963, life on Whiteman remained
relatively stable throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Still, there
were programs to continually update and improve the base's
weapons systems. Whiteman initially employed the
Minuteman I weapons system until the mid-1960s when a
force modernization program converted the Minuteman I to
the Minuteman II.