CUFON 4602d AISS UNIT HISTORY SAMPLER


 
 

A SAMPLER OF ITEMS FROM THE UNIT HISTORY OF
THE 4602d AIR INTELLIGENCE SERVICE SQUADRON
ENT AIR FORCE BASE, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
Part 2 of 7 Parts

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HISTORICAL DATA FOR 4602d AIR INTELLIGENCE SERVICE SQUADRON

ENT AIR FORCE BASE, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

FOR THE PERIOD: 1 JANUARY TO 30 JUNE 1953

COMPILED AND WRITTEN BY: APPROVED BY:

/s/ /s/
Douglas J Fulton                    John M. White, Jr.
AF 163xxxxx                        Colonel USAF
A/1C USAF                          Commander
Squadron Historian

REVIEWED BY: THIS document is classified SECRET In accordance with par23 B (6),
AFR 205-1

    /s/
Rial F. Gallagher dtd 24 July 1953.
Lt Col USAF
Deputy Commander 20 Nov 53

    /s/
William C. Van Norman
Major USAF
Adjutant

Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is prohibited except with the permission of the office of origin

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Copy 1 of 5 copies.

ASI 4602D AISS Classified
S01933 Document Log #2264

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INTRODUCTION

The year of 1953 saw the 1st "birthday of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron pass amid a solid period of building for the organization. The original purpose of the squadron, as outlined in ADCR 24-4 is two-fold. First it has "the combat mission of supporting the Air Defense Command intelligence function through overt collection, limited field analysis, and rapid reporting of air combat intelligence from positive field sources within the area of Air Defense Command responsibility. It will render such other general support of the Air Defense Command intelligence mission as shall be directed." Second, "During peacetime, the 4602d AISS has been assigned the primary mission of training, effecting liaison, and otherwise preparing for full and instantaneous performance of its combat mission; and the secondary mission of supporting Air Defense Command training and other activities to the extent consistent with the squadron's combat mission and primary peacetime mission."[1] It is the youngest and most unique of the five (5) AISO's within the Air Force, and covers the largest area geographically. Consistent with the peace time mission of the 4602d, training is going on at full speed within the squadron. Some is done through special Air Force Schools, some in conjunction with the Army, and those unique courses which cannot be found in the regular curricula are taught in the Squadron Headquarters. Liaison contacts, together with promises of equipment and manpower, have increased more than ten-fold, and many areas of the country have now been well covered. Reporting procedures have left with many military, semi-military, and civilian groups, so that they will know what, where and how to report to the

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1. ADCR 24-4, dtd 3 January 1953

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4602d in case of an attack.

This reporting period also saw the activation of six (6) new field units, one at Great Falls Air Base, Montana, in January; second at Minneapolis in February, the third at Tinker Air Force Base in February; the fourth at McGuire Air Force Base in February; the fifth at Pittsburgh in March; and the sixth at McGhee-Tyson in May.

It is the aim of this historical report to tell of some of the problems faced by this organization, and report some of the strides forward from 1 January 1953 to 30 June 1953.

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Air Technical Intelligence Training

As of June 1953 a total of 12 officers and 57 airmen had completed the Air Technical Intelligence Course at Wright-Patterson AFB Dayton, Ohio. After this course became an official USAF course, difficulties were encountered in getting authorization for 4602d AISS personnel to attend because of the prerequisites established. However, a letter from Col White to the Commanding General, ATIC, requesting the training of 4602d AISS personnel on an average basis without actually awarding an AFSC is expected to be favorably considered..[1]

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1. Ltr from Cmdr 4602d to CG ATIC, dtd 10 June 53.

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Interrogation Course

Language proficiency was deemed not sufficient in itself to meet the exacting demands of our mission which includes interrogation of captured hostile airmen as one of our responsibilities. Training in interrogation

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procedures and techniques was installed to equip 4602d AISS linguists and operations personnel to successfully discharge that part of our mission requiring interrogations.

The first curse was held at Headquarters 4602d AISS from 16 Feb through 13 March 1953 and included:

   1. Importance of Far East Operations (Col White)
   2. Wringer Operations (Col Gallagher)
   3. Basic Intelligence Terms
   4. Psychology of Questioning (Lt Woody, Base Legal Office)
   5. The Soviet Mind
   6. Basic Interrogation Techniques
   7. Map and Compass Reading
   8. Soviet Air Force
   9. Basic Interrogation Reports, AF Form 112
 10. Soviet Psychology and Soviet Intelligence System
 11. Geneva Convention
 12. Air Interrogation Guide
 13. Psychology, Form, and Tactics of Eastern Interrogation
 14. Sample USSR Documents, Customs
 15. Interrogation Problems and Report Writing
 16. Resisting Russian Interrogation (Lt Col Work, SAC)
 17. 4602d AISS Operational SOP's
 18. Personal Experiences (Col Rankin, ADC)
 19. Russian Equivalents and Abbreviations
 20. Intelligence References for the Interrogator
 21. Air Interrogation Guide, Technical Series
 22. Soviet and Satellite Air Forces

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 23. Training Films

The second interrogation course, revised and abridged, was held at Headquarters 4602d AISS from 18 May through 29 May 1953. It included the following:

   1. Basic Intelligence Terms
   2. Basic Interrogation Procedures
   3. Soviet and Satellite Characteristics
   4. Eastern Cases
   5. Recognition of Aircraft
   6. Recognition of uniforms
   7. Geneva Convention
   8. Air Intelligence Guide and Air Intelligence Bulletin
   9. Russian methods of Interrogation
 10. Interrogation Approaches
 11. Basic Interrogation Techniques
 12. Map and Compass Reading
 13. Case Histories of Eastern Interrogations
 14. Soviet Intelligence and Security Agencies

The instructors for these classes were chosen for the most part from squadron personnel. Many of these were experienced interrogators from Project Wringer in Europe, the 6004th AISS in Japan and Korea, and various intelligence agencies in World War II. During this period the 4602d AISS was fortunate in obtaining qualified speakers who addressed the students and permanent party personnel at headquarters, supplementing the regular interrogation classes. These lecturers were:

1. Lt Col Robert E. Work, D/I, 3904th Composite Wg, Stead AFB, Nevada (SAC), on 19 March 53. Col Work is one of the AF experts on interro-

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gation, and his lectures on his experiences in interrogating POW's during World War II proved most enlightening.

2. Col R G Ronka, Hq, ADC, gave two lectures on POW interrogation procedures and techniques. Col Ronka interrogated German prisoners during WW II and, drawing from his personal experiences, gave extremely informative and interesting lectures.

3. Major Arthur Lilly, Human Resources Research Institute, Maxwell AFB, Ala., on 20 Mar 1953, explained the mission and composition of his organization to personnel of the 4602d AISS. Major Lilly stated that the HRRI will soon complete an interrogator's guide based on their research and that the 4602d will be included on the distribution list for this study.

4. On 18 Mar 1953, Piotr Pirogov, a former Soviet Air Force Lt who became famous in 1948 when he flew from the Ukraine to Linz, Austria, spent the afternoon at Headquarters 4602d AISS. Mr. Pirogov described his background and career in the Soviet Air Force and the events leading up to his now historic flight.

5. Major Ellis Vander Pyle of the Intelligence School, Lowry AFB, presented a lecture on the Far East situation to headquarters personnel on 9 April 1953.

6. Lt Col George E Schneider, former USAF Air Attach‚ to Poland, spoke to headquarters personnel on 18 June 1953. He described his experience during the 2 1/4 years he spent in Poland, the status of Polish airfields, and the observation of Soviet activity in Poland.

Atomic Energy Indoctrination

Information received from Headquarters, USAF indicated that 300 spaces will be available to the Air Force in the Special Weapons Indoctrination Course conducted by the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project at Sandia Base,

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Albuquerque, New Mexico. These spaces will be available during the period 1 May to 31 Dec 1953.

In compliance with the letter (1st Ind, 24 Mar 53) 4602d AISS requested a quota of five (5) spaces in the Special Weapons Indoctrination Course be made available to qualified field grade officers. It was further requested that consideration be given to permit ten (10) company grade officers of this organization to attend this course. This request was based on the requirement for special weapons information in relation to the primary mission of this organization. These company grade officers would possess the required TOP SECRET clearance. Copies of the basic letter and endorsements have been included in the documentation of this history.

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PERSONNEL AND ADMINISTRATION

During this period, due to the increase and intensification of the mission of the organization, the following changes were proposed to Headquarters ADC in the Table of Distribution of the 4602d AISS:

1. To be Deleted: 1 AFSC 20470 (Intell Ops Technician)
1 AFSC 20530 (Tech Intell Specialist)
1 AFSC 70230 (Appr Clerk)
3. AFSC 20471 (Photo Intrp Technician)

2. To be Added: 3 AFSC 20370 (Lang Technician)
1 AFSC 29351 (Sr Ground Radio Op)
1 AFSC 29370 (Sr Ground Radio Technician)
1 AFSC 64132 (Supply Records Clerk))

These changes are now under consideration at Headquarters ADC, and are expected to be approved in the near future. It is felt by this headquarters that the additions to the squadron T/D will be of incalculable value in the performance of the mission of the 4602d.

Since 1 Jan 53, the squadron personnel strength has steadily increased, primarily due to the return of personnel from overseas assignment. This squadron is the only organization the Zone of the Interior to which Intelligence-Linguist personnel can be sent for the best possible utilization upon their return from overseas assignment. Consequently, we have received a number of people from the 6004th AISS in Japan, the 7050th AISW in Germany, the 5004th AISS in Alaska, and the 1142d SAS in Austria. Since there are four OS Intelligence Organizations and only one in the ZI, the percentage of gains to this squadron is not consistent with the percentage of losses.

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ADCR 24-4
1-5

ADC REGULATION )    HEADQUARTERS AIR DEFENSE COMMAND
24-4 )                              Ent Air Force
                                        Base, Colorado Springs, Colo.
                                        3 January 1953

ORGANIZATION - AIR BASES AND AIR UNITS

1. Purpose. This regulation prescribes the mission, organization, functions and responsibilities of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron (AISS) and the responsibilities within the Air Defense Command for its control, support and general deployment.

2. References. ADCR 200-1; AFR 23-9; AFM 77-1; AFR 200-5; ADCR 200-3 (Classified), and General Order 47, Headquarters ADC, 1952.

3. Mission. a. The 4602d AISS has the combat mission of supporting the Air Defense Command intelligence function through overt collection, limited field analysis, and rapid reporting of air combat intelligence from positive field sources within the area of Air Defense Command responsibility. It will render such other general support of the Air Defense Command intelligence mission as shall be directed.

   b. During peacetime, the 4602d AISS has been assigned the primary mission of training, effecting
       liaison, and otherwise preparing for full and instantaneous performance of its combat mission;
       and the secondary mission of supporting Air Defense Command training and other activities to
       the extent consistent with the squadron's combat mission and primary peacetime mission.

4. Organization, Control and Support.  a. The 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron is a Table of Distribution Unit allocated to the Air Defense Command by Headquarters USAF for the specific purpose of performing the mission set forth in paragraph 3, above. it is organized as follows:

      (1) Headquarters 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron will be located at Headquarters, Air
           Defense Command.

      (2) Detachment Headquarters will be established and maintained at each air defense force
           Headquarters.

      (3) Numbered flights, each subordinate to one of the detachments, located at various points
            throughout the area of responsibility as may be specifically prescribed from time to time by
            the Commanding General, Air Defense Command.

      (4) The squadron headquarters has full administrative capability, but no logistic support
            capability. detachments and subordinate flights have only limited administrative and no
            logistical support capabilities.

   b. Headquarters, Air Defense Command will ensure over-all logistical support to the 4602d Air
       Intelligence Service Squadron and its field units throughout the Air Defense Command. This
       support will be provided by the nearest Air Force base in accordance with AFR 11-4.  The
       squadron commander has direct access to Headquarters Air Defense Command staff agencies.

5. Functions. The functions of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron are:

   a. To fulfill Air Defense Command combat readiness elements of information by overt collection of
       air combat intelligence in the Air Defense

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ADCR 24-4
5-6

       Command area of responsibility through the interrogation of captured enemy personnel, the
       examination and field analysis of enemy materiel, and the translation of captured enemy
       documents.

   b. To supply the Deputy Chief of Staff/Intelligence with timely information and technical assistance
       in discharge of responsibility for Weapons Impact Evaluation (Air Defense Command aspects
       of the Bomb Damage Assessment Program).

   c. To procure and/or train and maintain the necessary personnel qualified in general intelligence
       procedures, written and spoken foreign languages, technical intelligence investigation,
       photography and photo interpretation, and other such activities as may be necessary for the
       accomplishment of the mission.

   d. To establish through procurement and training, a capability on the part of the personnel for
       prompt physical access to and effective operations in remote areas, over all types of terrain,
       and in all conditions of climate and weather. Training will specifically include, but is not confined
       to, cold weather, desert and swamp survival; skiing, snow shoeing, mountain climbing, animal
       transport and parachutist operations.

6. Responsibilities.  a. The 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron will be responsible for:

      (1) Exercise of administrative control and, under the general direction of Deputy Chief of Staff
            Intelligence, Air Defense Command, centralized operational control for deployed units and
            personnel.

      (2) Establishment and maintenance of effective liaison and coordination with military,
            semi-military, governmental, and civilian agencies listed below:

         (a) Military organizations to include, but not limited to, Headquarters Air Defense Command
              and subordinate units, Army Anti-Aircraft Command, other Air Force commands and
              subordinate units, Army, Navy, Marine and Coast Guard command and subordinate units.

         (b) Semi-military agencies to include, but not limited to, Civil Defense Administration, Ground
              Observer Corps, and Civil Air Patrol.

         (c) Governmental agencies to include, but not limited to, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal
              Bureau of Investigation, Civil Aeronautics Administration, Federal and State Park and
              Forestry Services, State and local law enforcement agencies.

         (d) Civil agencies when appropriate and in accordance with governing regulations,
              AFR 205-1 and ADCR 190-4, to include, but not limited to, the press, radio, television,
              telephone and telegraph companies, land grant agencies, flying clubs, etc.

      (3) Arranging through local facilities for transportation of requisite personnel to intelligence
            targets.

      (4) Arranging for rapid dissemination of collected intelligence through prescribed channels using
           organizational communications where appropriate.

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ADCR 24-4
6-7

      (5) Keeping fully acquainted with all established training facilities, exploitation of which will
           further the squadron's training mission, and initiating action pointed toward such exploitation.

     (6) Exploitation of squadron capabilities and training activities for the benefit of organizations to
          which attached to the maximum extent consonant with the squadron mission, along such lines
          as crash rescue and investigation; language, technical, and intelligence instruction; and direct
          support of intelligence operations within Air Defense Command.

   b. All echelons of Air Defense Command are responsible for the administrative and logistical
       support o the field units of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron in discharge of their
       highly specialized mission. This responsibility includes, but is not limited to the provision of:

      (1) Transportation -- surface and air. Operations officers will authorize flights for 4602d AISS
            field units for training purposes, photo reconnaissance requirements, and liaison and
            coordination visits to local governmental and civilian agencies. Transportation officers will
            authorize vehicles to be used for round trip distances up to 500 miles, in accordance with
            Chapter 3, paragraph 8h, AFM 77-1.

      (2) Communications facilities, as tie lines and teletype.

      (3) Office and storage space and supplies.

      (4) Billeting and subsistence.

      (5) Petty cash facilities. Funding assistance will be rendered field units in obtaining petty cash
           from bases at which they are located. Petty cash facilities normally will be limited to
           purchased incident to the peculiar mission of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron.
           Any other purchases will be rigidly controlled by the limitations of paragraph 11,
           AFR 70-19.

   c. Air defense force and air division (defense) commanders, or their representatives are authorized
       to provide letters of introduction to of detachments or flights of the 4602d Air Intelligence
       Service Squadron, within their area of responsibility, in order to facilitate liaison with local
       governmental and civilian agencies.

   d. Headquarters, Air Defense Command will take appropriate action to assist in the procurement
       of collateral training facilities and equipment to the maximum extent required for accomplishing
       the squadron mission.

Authority. Letter, this headquarters, 7 January 1952, to DI, Headquarters USAF, Washington, 25, D.C., Subject: Air Intelligence Service Squadron, 1st Ind thereto by Headquarters USAF, 6 February 1952. (ADDIN)

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL CHIDLAW:

JARED V. CRABB
Brigadier General, USAF
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff

    /s/
JOHN W. JONES
Lt Colonel, USAF
Asst Adj Gen

DISTRIBUTION: 3
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HEADQUARTERS
AIR DEFENSE COMMAND
ENT AIR FORCE BASE
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

GENERAL ORDERS
NUMBER 23 14 April 1953

AMENDMENT OF GENERAL ORDERS

1. Paragraph 1, Section 111, General Orders 47, 1952, and amending General Orders 20, 1953, is deleted and the following substituted therefor: Effective 11 April 1953, the following flights of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron are attached to Air Force Bases and units indicated for
logistic support:
 

FLIGHT
    ATTACHED TO
Flight 1-A McChord AFB, Washington
Flight 1-B Great Falls AFB, Montana
Flight 2-C Norton AFB, San Bernardino, California
Flight 2-D Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New
Flight 2-A 514th Air Defense Group, Minneapolis- St Paul, International Airport, Minnesota
Flight 2-B 516th Air Defense Group, McGhee-Tyson Airport, Tennessee
Flight 2-C Dobbins AFB, Marietta, Georgia
Flight 2-D Tinker AFB, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Flight 3-A 501st Air Defense Group O'Hare International Airport, Illinois
Flight 3-B Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio
Flight 3-C Selfridge AFB, Mt Clemens, Michigan
Flight 3-D Griffiss AFB, Rome, New York
Flight 3-E Ethan Allen AFB, Vermont
Flight 3-F 500th Air Defense Group Greater Pittsburgh Airport, Pennsylvania
Flight 3-G Presque Isle AFB, Presque Isle, Maine
Flight 3-H McGuire AFB, Wrightstown, New Jersey
Flight 3-I  Andrews AFB, Camp Springs, Maryland

2. Authority: AFR 20-52, as amended.

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL CHIDLAW:

JARED V. CRABB
Brigadier General, USAF
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff

   /s/
JOHN W. JONES
Lt Colonel, USAF
Asst Adj Gen

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HEADQUARTERS
AIR DEFENSE COMMAND
Ent Air Force Base
Colorado Springs, Colorado

GENERAL ORDERS
NUMBER 47                                                                                        17 October 1952

REORGANIZATION OF 4602D AIR INTELLIGENCE
SERVICE SQUADRON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SECTION I
DESIGNATION AND ORGANIZATION OF AIR INTELLIGENCE
SERVICE FLIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SECTION II

SECTION I

1. Effective 10 October 1952, the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron, a Table of Distribution Unit, is reorganized with an authorized strength of 61 officers and 133 airmen.

2. Personnel will be furnished from sources available to this command.

3. Administrative and housekeeping equipment is authorized in accordance with Table of Allowance 1-1, March 1952, Table of Allowance 1-21, December 1951, and Special Equipment List as authorized by Headquarters USAF and Air Material Command.

4. Nonappropriated funds will be governed by the provisions of he AFR 176-1 and AFR 176-2.

5. Concurrent with above action the following detachments of the Air Intelligence Service Squadron are reorganized with strength as indicated:
 


DETACHMENT
*AUTHORIZED STRENGTH 
OFF   AMN
Detachment 1 (Hq) 4 8
Detachment 2 (Hq) 4 8
Detachment 3 (Hq) 4 8

6. Authority: AFR 20-52, as amended.

SECTION II

1. Effective 10 October 1952, the following flights of the 4602d Air
Intelligence Service Squadron are designated and organized at stations and
with strength as indicated:
 
 
 

DETACHMENT *AUTHORIZED STRENGTH 
                                     OFF    AMN
Flight 1-A, McChord Field, Tacoma, Washington    2    5
Flight 1-B, Great Falls AFB, Great Montana    2    5

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GENERAL ORDERS (Cont)
NUMBER 47
 

DETACHMENT *AUTHORIZED STRENGTH 
            OFF   AMN
Flight 1-C, Norton AFB, San Bernardino, California 2 5
Flight 1-D, Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New Mexico 2 5
Flight 2-A, Minneapolis-St Paul, Intl Aprt, Minnesota 2 5
Flight 2-B, McGhee-Tyson Aprt, Knoxville, Tennessee 2 5
Flight 2-C, Dobbins AFB, Marietta, Georgia 2 5
Flight 2-D, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2 5
Flight 3-A, O'Hare Intl Aprt, Chicago, Illinois 2 5
Flight 3-B, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio 2 5
Flight 3-C, Selfridge Field, Mt Clemens, Michigan 2 5
Flight 3-D, Hancock Field, Syracuse, New York 2 5
Flight 3-E, Ft Ethan Allen, Vermont 2 5
Flight 3-F, Greater Pittsburgh Aprt, Pennsylvania 2 5
Flight 3-G, Presque Isle AFB, Presque Isle, Maine 2 5
Flight 3-H, McGuire AFB, Wrightstown, New Jersey 2 5
Flight 3-I, Andrews AFB, Camp Springs, Maryland 2 5

2. Authority: AFR 20-52, as amended.

SECTION III

1. Effective 10 October 1952, the following flights of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron are attached to units indicated for logistics only:
 

FLIGHT ATTACHED TO:
Flight 1-A  25th Air Division (Defense)
Flight 1-B  29th Air Division (Defense)
Flight 1-C  27th Air Division (Defense)
Flight 1-D  34th Air Division (Defense)
Flight 2-A  31st Air Division (Defense)
Flight 2-B  74th Air Base Squadron
Flight 2-C  35th Air Division (Defense)
Flight 2-D  33d Air Division (Defense)
Flight 3-A  4706th Defense Wing
Flight 3-B  4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron
Flight 3-C  4708th Defense Wing
Flight 3-D  32d Air Division (Defense)
Flight 3-E  75th Air Base Squadron

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GENERAL ORDERS (Cont)
NUMBER 47
 

FLIGHT ATTACHED TO:
Flight 3-F  81st Air Base Squadron
Flight 3-G  4711th Defense Wing
Flight 3-H  4709th Defense Wing
Flight 3-I  4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron

2. Authority: AFR 20-52, as amended.

* (Personnel authorizations for detachments and flights are derived from and not in addition to the total authorized strength of the parent squadron.)

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL CHIDLAW:

JARED V. CRABB
Brigadier General, USAF
OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff

    /s/
JOHN W. JONES
Lt Colonel, USAF
Asst Adj Gen

A TRUE COPY

RICHARD C VAUGHN
2D Lt, USAF
Asst Adj

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CONFIDENTIAL
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HEADQUARTERS
4602D AIR INTELLIGENCE SERVICE SQUADRON
Ent Air Force Base
Colorado Springs, Colorado

A SUMMARY OF THE SECOND COMMANDER'S CONFERENCE
22, 23, 24, AND 25 JUNE 1953

THIS DOCUMENT CONSISTS OF SIXTY (60) PAGES

COPY NUMBER 21 OF 35 COPIES

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953
CONFIDENTIAL

3. THE TEXT OF A SPEECH GIVEN BY BRIGADIER GENERAL WOOBURY M. BURGESS, DCS/I,  HEADQUARTERS ADC

Last Friday while Colonel White was away, Lt Col Gallagher called up and said that they had been requested by Washington to send eleven officers to Korea, and to come back, in case of a truce, with the returning U S Prisoners of War for the purpose of interrogation. That, of course, means about sixty days TDY for eleven officers. That will seriously cripple your present capability , especially for interrogation. It will cripple some of your language capability. nevertheless, it's the type of thing which this squadron must be ready to do at any time; and it will certainly have an advantage from the point of view of training, from the point of view of gathering certain information in which the Air Defense Command may be interested. In other words, we can by the use of that addition to the interrogation team have some influence on the type of interrogation. I'm very much interested in the project as it goes forward, and I think we can afford to take the calculated risk of lessening the effectiveness here in the United States.

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953 RESTRICTED

5. OPERATIONS (SUMMARY OF LT COL JONES' PRESENTATION)

a. UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

Investigation of unidentified flying objects is not presently part of the mission of this Squadron. Field units are not authorized to make investigations of this type unless so directed or prior approval is obtained from this Headquarters. If ATIC gets a report and feels an investigation is necessary, they will notify this Headquarters and we in turn will then direct the proper field team to make the investigation.

If you are asked by the D/I of your division to make an investigation, let us know about it. If it is not going to involve too much time, you can go ahead and make the investigation based on your own judgment. Don't let this sort of thing get out of hand, but if it will assist you in your relationships with the D/I and you feel that you have the time, go ahead. Otherwise, notify this Headquarters for prior approval.

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2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953 RESTRICTED

...

The EEI will be used as a basis for reporting during the ADX.   Develop information outlined in the EEI, but don't refer specifically to the EEI when you submit your intelligence report.

During an actual war, it is permissible to transmit information classified up to and including SECRET in the clear provided it is operationally necessary. However, information classified above RESTRICTED would never be sent in the clear during a training exercise.

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953 RESTRICTED

When a field team reaches the scene of a crash, they should send a flash report in immediately stating that they are at the scene of a crash with a brief description of what is found. Three hours after reaching the scene, another flash report should be sent listing all flash intelligence gathered to that time. Twenty-four hours after reaching the scene, a twenty-four hour intelligence summary will be submitted. If the mission lasts for more than one day, a twenty-four hour report will be dispatched for every twenty-four hour period. There is no limit to the number of flash reports which may be transmitted on a single investigation. The number of flash reports will depend on the intelligence value of the information being collected.

Then within seventy-two hours after the field team returns to their station, they will submit a complete report on the investigation on the Form 112 to the local D/I with an information copy to Headquarters 4602d. Only one Form 112 will be submitted per investigation except in rare cases where extremely vital intelligence information may be involved. Time is of the essence - get all intelligence information into intelligence channels just as soon as it is humanly possible.

...

g. POLICY ON PUBLIC RELATIONS: do not try to get the 4602d AISS or the names of 4602d personnel in the paper. When members of this Squadron participate in special activities such as rescue missions where it is virtually impossible to remain anonymous, it is all right to identify yourselves as members of the 4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron. Inasmuch as this Squadron is new and completely unique, PIO men would like very much to publicize our activities and write-up Squadron personalities. However it is again emphasized that absolutely no publicity is to be given to the Squadron mission or to individuals within the Squadron. the only exception to this will be in special cases such as the one mentioned above where the Squadron activities are necessarily in the public eye. In other words, stay away from publicity except when it becomes a must. If there is any doubt or if special permission is desired to release information in various media, contact this Headquarters for an approval or disapproval.

...

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

...

b. SECURITY CLEARANCES

It is necessary that every man in this organization be cleared for access to SECRET information. It is further necessary that no man be given access to classified information above restricted until he is cleared. All clearances are requested by this headquarters. In several instances, clearances have been requested by OIC's through local Provost Marshals. This procedure results in duplication of effort by this Headquarters and, more important, a duplication of effort by investigating agencies. All clearances will be requested by the security section at Squadron Headquarters.

Confusion has existed in the field as to the degree of clearance to which an individual is cleared for access and the clearance previously granted and entered in appropriate personnel records. Because a man's records reflect that an NAC and a BI have been completed and he is cleared for Top Secret does not mean he may have access, within this squadron, to Top Secret. Even though his records reflect clearance to Top Secret, he cannot have access to even confidential information until he is granted such access by the Provost Marshall, Ent AFB. This is not a situation peculiar to this organization or to this command, but a procedure which is Air Force wide. Neither clearance previously granted nor rank authorizes access to classified information. In many instances persons who have previously had access to Top Secret may, in the Squadron have access to Secret only.

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

...

1. HANDLING OF CLASSIFIED DOCUMENTS

The meaning of a registered document should be clarified. A registered document is a Top Secret, Secret, Confidential, or Restricted document assigned a short title and a copy number with instructions to account for the document periodically. This is not to be confused with a classified document to which a control number is affixed for administrative reasons, with no instructions to account for it periodically.

The first form used in connection with a registered document is AF Form 163, "Registered Material Transfer Report". This report will be prepared each time an Officer in Charge of a field unit is relieved of his duty assignment. This report will be prepared in four copies and signed by the newly assigned officer. distribution of this form is as follows:

1 copy to Air Adj Gen, Hq USAF, ATTN: Custodian of Registered Documents; 1 copy to Commander, ADC, ATTN: Custodian of Registered Documents; 1 copy to Hq 4602d AISS, ATTN: Custodian of Registered Documents; and 1 copy for file of the unit concerned.

AF Form 165, "Registered Material Inventory Report", will be used to report inventory of registered documents only and is due twice yearly. The due dates will be included in the Squadron SOP which is being prepared on this subject.

AF Form 164, "Registered Material Destruction Report". This form is to be used at any time a registered document is destroyed. A registered document will be destroyed upon written instruction from the Office of Record or when a change supersedes individual pages within the registered documents.

Classified documents - An inventory will be effected of all classified documents which are physically present at the time of the inventory and report of transfer signed by the newly assigned officer. Forms are being prepared for this report. It will be prepared in two copies, one copy for Hq 4602d and one copy for file in the unit concerned.

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

Certificates of destruction will be prepared an all classified documents destroyed and will include the classified log number assigned by this Headquarters, and the subject or title of the document, and the number of copies destroyed. this report will be prepared in at least two copies, one copy for Hq 4602d and one copy for file in the unit concerned.

The reports mentioned above will bear the following classification: Registered Document Transfer and Registered Document Inventory will be Restricted; Registered Document Destruction will be Confidential; Reports of Transfer, Inventory and Destruction of Classified Documents will be Restricted unless the subject or title of a document is classified. In this case the report will bear the highest degree of classification of the contents.

All Top Secret and Secret matter will show the authority for the classification, the initials of the classifying officer, and the date the classification was affixed, as require by par 28c, AFR 205-1A.

Changes in classification will be made in accordance with 27b (1), AFR 205-1. Individuals authorized to change or cancel the classification of a document will, when taking such action, write or stamp on the cover or first page thereof and such other pages as may be necessary, the following: "Classification canceled or change to _ _ _ _, by authority of (officer authorized to change classification by name and grade) (date)".

...

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

{A SUMMARY OF COLONEL WHITE'S CLOSING REMARKS, Cont}

...

g. WEAPONS AND E-1 KITS

The carbine and the 45 caliber pistol are the only squadron approved weapons. Only in rare cases when the weapons just mentioned are not available will it be authorized to carry 38 caliber p.  E-1 kits are strictly for survival purposes and will not be scavenged or used on filed trips unless absolutely necessary.

...

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

{A SUMMARY OF COLONEL WHITE'S CLOSING REMARKS, Cont.}

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o. RESCUE MISSIONS

Let's keep up the kind of rescue service, whenever possible, which Lt. Johnson recently accomplished at San Gorgonio. Your units are in a position to render a great service by helping out in this way. I would rather see one rescue field mission accomplished than fifty classes in Russian. I addition to performing a humanitarian act, these mission do much to establish good relationships with agencies from whom we may desire assistance in the event of war. Never pass up an opportunity to assist in a rescue activity.

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4602d AISS, ENT AFB, COLO
2ND CMDRS CONF, 22 JUNE 1953

{A SUMMARY OF COLONEL WHITE'S CLOSING REMARKS, Cont.}

never take the cold-hearted approach to an air crash when death and disaster are involved. At a time like this, the humanitarian aspects are far more important than performing a technical investigation. So don't ask the Base Commander for permission to exploit a crash for investigation purposes when he is personally worried about the accident, notifying relatives, and recovering bodies. Rather, let the Base Commander know that you have the equipment and know-how, and make the services of your unit available in the event he wishes to call on you.

...

    /s/
CALVIN HAMMOND JR
1st Lt, USAF
Conference Project Officer

    /s/
JOHN M WHITE JR
Colonel, USAF
Commander

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HEADQUARTERS AIR DEFENSE COMMAND
ENT AIR FORCE BASE
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

ADPTR-F 353 09 MAR 1953

SUBJECT: (Unclassified) Atomic Energy Indoctrination

TO: Commanding Officer
4602d Air Intelligence Service Squadron
Ent Air Force Base
Colorado Springs, Colorado

1. Information received from Headquarters, USAF indicates three hundred (300) spaces will be available to the Air Force in the Special Weapons Indoctrination Course conducted by the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project a Sandia Base, Albuquerque, new Mexico. These spaces will be available during the period 2 May through 31 December 1953.

2. The mission of the Special Weapons Indoctrination Course is to familiarize designated Army, Navy, and Air Force Officers with the over-all operation of the Atomic Energy program. The scope of the course is:

   a. To familiarize the class with the technical functioning, capabilities, and limitations of atomic
       weapons.

   b. To present the effects of atomic weapons.

   c. To outline the logistic requirements for assembly organizations and the delivery services to
       include changes with new developments.

   d. To discuss the employment of atomic weapons, including delivery systems.

   e. To present the future developments and improvements that can be expected in the field of
       atomic weapons.

3. The length of this course is four (4) days, Tuesday through Friday.  Frequency of course is approximately every two (2) weeks.

4. Field grade officers and civilian personnel with equivalent of GS-12 rating or higher who in the performance of their duties require access to information indicated above are eligible for attendance to this course.

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SECURITY INFORMATION

Hq, ADC, ADPTR-F 353, Subject: (Unclassified) Atomic Energy Indoctrination (Contd)

5 Personnel selected for attendance to this course must possess a minimum of a TOP SECRET clearance.

6. In order that provisions may be made for your command to participate in this training, it is requested that this headquarters be advised of your training requirements by 3 April 1953.

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL CHIDLAW:

ROBERT N. BRUCE
Lt Col, USAF
Dir of Tng

...

2

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{End of Part 2 of CUFON's 4602d AISS UFO Sampler}

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